Bay of Biscay : Carnac Megaliths

Getting close to our end point we stopped near Carnac to walk amongst the megalithic alignments and sites that always impress.

A morning of cold grey drizzle on the motorway north through Nantes behind us we arrived in Locmariaquer to the west of the Golfe Du Morbihan in clearing weather. Planning ahead had become more difficult now because so many sites were shutting up for the winter and those that were open had limited facilities and often decidedly worn pitches. We still managed to find a comfortable spot for a few days from which to explore the Neolithic sites.

The coast and beaches around Morbihan are nice but more often suited to Oyster farming. Locmariaquer is on the western spit where the entrance to the gulf is reduced to just a couple of hundred metres. The effect of this on the tide is dramatic and it surges in and out of the gulf. The village itself is almost the ususal small Bretagne seaside village except for its important Megalith and Cairn.

Carnac Allignments

We have visited the Carnac Alignments several times before but never when it was possible to walk among the stones. These neolithic alignments are in several ranges spread over a few kilometres. The stones were first raised Between 4000BC and 5000BC. Today there are approximately 1200 of the possible 3000 that were originally erected but have since been robbed out or vandalised. Even some of the present stones have been replaced or raised from a recumbent position as it is only in the last 150 years that the government has managed to take control of them. There really is nothing that can compare to these ancient symbols. Stonehenge is spectacular for the size of its stones and the distance they came from and there are many other interesting prehistoric sites. However when you gaze upon the shear scale of what was done at Carnac by plain old brute force and for what who knows?

We walked among the Menac and Kemario alignments before delving up a muddy track through the forest to take a look at a part we had not seen before. The Geant du Manio and Qudrilatere du Menhir. The Geant is is a huge lone menhir that stands 6.5 metres high.

We meandered back to Locmariaquer around the coast and stopped for lunch with a gorgeaous view over the water to La Trinité and across to Quiberon before strolling around the marina at La Trinité to admire the enormous ocean racing trimarans that are seemingly sculpted fro carbon fibre.

img_1420That evening Sue very bravely embarked upon pizza but this time with somehwat unknown bread flour from Intermarche. Good though they were we can’t recommend that flour although the variation in temperature may not have helped in proving the dough.

The following day we took a look at the tide surge at the mouth of the gulf and then around the beach. Fred really is quite amusing sometimes, we walked quite a way along the beach but would not let him go in the water because it was a bit weedy and scummy and to be frank he already smells enough when he gets wet, however once we got a clear bit he was straight in just for a few minutes and was happy as if he had just scratched that itch.

That afternoon we paid a visit to the local neolithic site including the Menhir de Brise that would have stood 20 metres high when it was erected along with a line of smaller stones around 4700BC. This giant stone weighing in at 330 tonnes is of a type of rock that occurs at least 10km away and would have been dragged to this site. The menhir fell and broke, probably due to earth tremors, around 4000BC and smaller stones are long got robbed for other structures on this site and elsewhere. Also on the site are 2 seperate grave monuments. The first is the Table des Marchands a dolmen that has been partly reconstructed. It was originally constructed with pieces of stone with decorative carvings that show they came from the adjacent broken and missing menhirs. Then there is the Er-Grah tumulus that started life as a cairn before 4000BC and was extended to a 140 metre long tumulus that was completed around 3300BC. Here the remains of the grave goods here were found to contain axe heads and precious stones of a rock found in Northern Spain. Obviously the grave of an important person.

Our 2 day cultural trip to visit the stones left us in awe yet again of what these people achieved so long ago. Something to ponder as we headed further west to our “home” in Finistere.