Edinburgh and the Rolling Stones

My favourite city, possibly because it’s where I come from, and the greatest rock and roll band in the world. An irresistible combination!

The decision was taken some weeks ago to forego the NC500 this year, after all we are going to the Nordkap in August and one cool holiday a year is more than enough. Oh and Jensen Button is finally racing at Le Mans against Fernando Alonso and we are not going to miss that. Still we had planned to visit relatives and we had tickets for Rolling Stones at Murrayfield and we weren’t going to miss that either.

img_1916So we set off on a grey and misty Monday morning heading round London and towards the the A1 – the Great North Road. We made an overnight stop at the convenient CCC site in Boroughbridge home to many bunnies much to Fred’s excitement. The following morning the weather cleared to give great views of all landmarks we passed, the Angel of the North, Bamburgh Castle, Lindisfarne and the Firth of Forth as the road rides along the cliff tops north of Berwick upon Tweed.

Fred at LinwaterWe had found Linwater Caravan Park just a few miles west of Edinburgh. It got great reviews and looked like it would suit us well and certainly better that the overpriced Caravan Club site at Silverknowes and we were not disappointed. A family owned and run site, well tended with spacious pitches, decent facilities and excellent service and support.

The site backs on to the Almond River valley and Almondell Country Park. There are several walks in and around the area and alongside a fast flowing channel that feeds the Forth Clyde Canal at Lins Viaduct. It was here that Fred decided the stream was perfect for drinking and cooling off in and once he had we couldn’t stop him diving in for a swim each time.

We whiled away one pleasant lunch time and afternoon at the site with cousin Ellen and Ian and another visiting the Kelpies with cousin Margaret. The Kelpies are a pair of enormous horses head statues standing beside the Union canal at Falkirk. They are amazing facsimiles of the horses that used pull the narrow boats and are the centre piece of the Helix Park regeneration project.

Just before we came away our solar panel packed up. The guy who supplied it sent me a new one to fit while we were on site and true to form the carrier, Parcel Force, mucked us about. Anyway it got there eventually and with the loan one evening of some steps from the site we got solar again and with a vengeance.

Saturday started with a shock for poor Fred. We couldn’t take him into the Rolling Stones concert and we wanted to have lunch in town beforehand. So he was booked into a local kennels and he wasn’t happy about being left there however nice the people were. A cab ride to the stadium and a tram ride into town and we mooched around the shops before lunch and after walked up the Royal Mile and sat in the sun and people watched in Princes Street Gardens. Lunch was our usual Edinburgh treat at Henderson’s in Hanover Street. It is a great self service vegetarian restaurant with an extensive and constantly varying menu.

And then there was the Rolling Stones. It turned out that our not too expensive tickets were actually quite good up in the stands with a good view down on to the stage. We have seen them before but this was probably the best yet. The play list was very similar to Hyde Park in 2015 and full of classic Rolling Stones numbers. It is said time and again but for a bunch of “old boys” the energy was incredible – but also vocal quality and fret / keyboard dexterity! Perhaps we can look forward to? Mick had a few Scottish jokes with the crowd and about the guys with mops and towels drying the runway. He introduced Ron as “we stole him from the Bay City Rollers” and Charlie as Bonnie Prince Smilie. Charlie then did cheesy grin through Sympathy For The Devil. The graphic visuals were brilliant and the fresh arrangements gave everything a very upbeat feel. The crowd were amazing too and the band looked like they were enjoying the show just as much.

We went to bed and woke again on Sunday with our ears literally numb from the sheer power of the sound. We were packed quickly and off to rescue Fred who was so pleased to see us that he could hardly stand for wagging his tail and bum. I am not sure that he was so impressed with the 470 mile 10 hour journey on a scorching hot day. But there you go – can’t have it all ways.

Summer is Coming

Van Blanc had its first dealer service this week at 15,000 miles and we are preparing for a summer full of adventures.

First a short trip to the Cotswolds to get Bug Blanc’s crank balanced and fetch the exhaust system. Then we are off to Edinburgh to see my relatives and the Rolling Stones (no I am not related to them).

After Edinburgh we had planned to do the NC500 but we had a late change of plan when we found out that, as well as Fernando Alonso, Jenson Button will be racing at Le Mans and as committed endurance sports car fans we could not resist. So we are heading home straight after the Stones concert for a quick turn around and heading to le Circuit de la Sarthe for the 23rd time. As we will already be in France we decided to head out to Brittany for a week at the sea side.

We do actually get a few weeks at home to enjoy summer at home and perhaps in our garden as well as going up country to a wedding but then we are off again. This time it will be the long haul to the Nordkapp and back, a round trip of 7500km. You might have read our previous Norway adventure when we got as far as the Arctic Circle since when we have regretted that we didn’t go further. Norway is a spectacular country and we are looking forward to enjoying it for several weeks.

So watch this space for updates and images from our summer 2018 adventures.

2018 Here We Come

What to do on a wet New Year? Book next years hols of course!

We have been looking forward to going back to Norway and this time we are going all the way to the top in August.Norway Map It is 2500km from Kristiansand to Nordkapp which is 5000km round trip, or 3000 miles. Add to that the 1300km from Calais to Hirtshals (the Tunnel to the ferry from Denmark) is a total of 7600km, or 4500 miles, without any detours and there will be plenty of those. We are allowing 5 weeks so a few days to get to Kristiansand and a few days back, hopefully via Holland where we can visit friends and and take Fred to the vet for his passport worming pill.

The Tunnel and Ferry together cost about £500. There are no great deals to be had on the Tunnel as our C&CC membership only works on silly o’clock trips and you we can’t use Tesco vouchers and include Fred who by the way Eurotunnel charge another £18 each way for! However the tunnel is better than the ferry simply because of the frequency that fits in better with our timing. It would have been good to have a flexible return but they want virtually double so we will just pay the penalty if we need to change. Another gripe with Eurotunnel is that they charge another £20 each way for our van. because it is a Motorcaravan – I tried to select van but when I put the registration in it objected.  Conversely Highways England refuse to let us cross Dartford as a Motorcaravan and charge us extra as a van!

Conversely Colorline Ferries from Hirtshals to Kristiansand is easy and user friendly. They are also quite a bit cheaper than Eurotunnel. There we can book on as a Small Car under 2m high and 5m long. Unladen we actually go 2020mm over the solar panel so with us, our travel kit, clothes and 4 weeks of food that we can’t afford to buy or can’t get in Norway I am sure we will find that 20mm.

This time we will allow and extra day to get from Calais to Hirtshals where we will top over the night before the ferry. We plan to go inland from Kristiansand to Trondheim but major route planning is easy especially north of Trondheim – there is only the E6! On the way back south we will do the coast again from Trondheim.

NC500 MapSo what else? Well continuing the Go North theme we are planning to do the North Coast 500. It is a few years since we visited my relatives in Edinburgh and 25 years since we last went further north. As it will be outside school holiday time I don’t think we will book anything so we can be free to go with the flow. Time and weather permitting we would like to do some of the islands and at least Skye and perhaps Orkney. There are a couple of sites close enough to Edinburgh where we can get into town easily and, if the weather is kind, host a picnic for my cousins.

Bay of Biscay : 3150 miles

Here is a flavour of how far we travelled, some 3150 miles Dieppe and back to Dieppe. Starting by travelling south down through France across the Loire, Limosin and Dordogne to the Pyrenees and across into Spain. From there we followed roughly the Camino de Santiago to the North West tip at Cabo Finisterre. After that it was easy – just follow the coast all the way to the tip of Brittany. And finally a quick run back the length of Brittany, and Normandy to Dieppe.


Apart from a few markers most of those on the map are the camp sites we stopped at en route. Below is a list with a few notes and our ratings;
Bay of Biscay Camp Sites

Bay of Biscay : Finisterre

As we left Morbihan and headed west toward Finisterre damp and chilly weather was forecast for the next week and at this time of year campsites are becoming scarce as they close for the winter. We decided to to head for our one last stop on our trip around the bay and to indulge ourselves with the luxury of a cabin for a few nights. Treboul – Douarnenez is 20km past Quimper on the south west corner of the Bai de Douarnenez. Douarnenez is famous historically for the sardine fishing industry and incidentally it is from here that the French Resistance sailed to and from Great Britain in WWII. On 18th June 1940 men from Douarnenez were among the first to sail to Great Britain to join General De Gaul become the Free French army.

I should explain that for several years we had a house in Treboul so the town is like our home in Brittany. We know it and the surrounding areas very well so even though we had not been here for a few years once we were on the road to Quimper it was all very familiar. We pitched up on a nice site which us just 500 metres from the Port du Plaisance of Treboul so an easy walk to the local shops and restaurants and of course our favourite Leclerc supper market. I had to smile while we were shopping in Leclerc when I bumped into my freind Olivier Youinou and promised to see him for coffee in a few days.

We spent Friday pottering around starting with a trip into the beautiful city of Quimper. It has a very classy, for which also read expensive, shopping district an a fabulous cathedral which for once did not have any hoardings or scaffold around it. It was a bright morning but very chilly so eventually after a cup of coffee in the sun we headed to the stores on the edge of town. My first stop was to Brico Depot, the absolute dogs whatsits when it comes to DIY and where we spent a lot of money when we were renovating our house, to find a tap fitting that I can’t get at home that I need to do a mod to the sink tap in the van. Next up we went into the huge Leclerc Hypermarket to look for a couple of warm pullovers – yes it was getting that cold.

And then to Saturday and the final part of our trip around the Bay of Biscay which took close to 1500 miles and 4 weeks. This end of Brittany was called Finis Terre by the Romans, Latin for End of the World, just like they named Cabo Finisterre in Spain and hence the Departement du Finisterre ( 29 ) in France. It is about 20km from Treboul to the absolute tip, the Point du Raz, that sts amongs an area designated as a national park. The point itself is a huge heather and gorse covered area sitting atop rocky cliffs looking out ove the Athlantic Ocean toward North America. On top of the point is a large coastal look out station and on the various rocks below are a number of lighthouses. Situated a 8km offshore is the low rocky island of the Ile de Sein just 1800m x 500m it is entirely one village.

 

The sea around the the Point du Raz is often a frothy mess where the currents swirl around the point and giant waves crash over the lighthouses. Even on nice days it is rarely quiet. On the headland and from the cliffs you watch all manor of bird life that changes over the year with the seasons. Often you can see dolphins swimming below presumably compete Inn with the fishermen for what sardines remain in these waters today. This weekend however the weather was flat calm so much so that you would have been safe swimming in the clear blue water around the point. The tide was along way out so that all the rocks were well exposed. The air was so clear that for the first time we can remember we could make out big ships on the horizon and see Brest clearly to the north.

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So here we accomplished what we set out to do, drive around the Bay of Biscay, it just took a bit longer than driving around Normans Bay at home.

Bay of Biscay : Carnac Megaliths

Getting close to our end point we stopped near Carnac to walk amongst the megalithic alignments and sites that always impress.

A morning of cold grey drizzle on the motorway north through Nantes behind us we arrived in Locmariaquer to the west of the Golfe Du Morbihan in clearing weather. Planning ahead had become more difficult now because so many sites were shutting up for the winter and those that were open had limited facilities and often decidedly worn pitches. We still managed to find a comfortable spot for a few days from which to explore the Neolithic sites.

The coast and beaches around Morbihan are nice but more often suited to Oyster farming. Locmariaquer is on the western spit where the entrance to the gulf is reduced to just a couple of hundred metres. The effect of this on the tide is dramatic and it surges in and out of the gulf. The village itself is almost the ususal small Bretagne seaside village except for its important Megalith and Cairn.

Carnac Allignments

We have visited the Carnac Alignments several times before but never when it was possible to walk among the stones. These neolithic alignments are in several ranges spread over a few kilometres. The stones were first raised Between 4000BC and 5000BC. Today there are approximately 1200 of the possible 3000 that were originally erected but have since been robbed out or vandalised. Even some of the present stones have been replaced or raised from a recumbent position as it is only in the last 150 years that the government has managed to take control of them. There really is nothing that can compare to these ancient symbols. Stonehenge is spectacular for the size of its stones and the distance they came from and there are many other interesting prehistoric sites. However when you gaze upon the shear scale of what was done at Carnac by plain old brute force and for what who knows?

We walked among the Menac and Kemario alignments before delving up a muddy track through the forest to take a look at a part we had not seen before. The Geant du Manio and Qudrilatere du Menhir. The Geant is is a huge lone menhir that stands 6.5 metres high.

We meandered back to Locmariaquer around the coast and stopped for lunch with a gorgeaous view over the water to La Trinité and across to Quiberon before strolling around the marina at La Trinité to admire the enormous ocean racing trimarans that are seemingly sculpted fro carbon fibre.

img_1420That evening Sue very bravely embarked upon pizza but this time with somehwat unknown bread flour from Intermarche. Good though they were we can’t recommend that flour although the variation in temperature may not have helped in proving the dough.

The following day we took a look at the tide surge at the mouth of the gulf and then around the beach. Fred really is quite amusing sometimes, we walked quite a way along the beach but would not let him go in the water because it was a bit weedy and scummy and to be frank he already smells enough when he gets wet, however once we got a clear bit he was straight in just for a few minutes and was happy as if he had just scratched that itch.

That afternoon we paid a visit to the local neolithic site including the Menhir de Brise that would have stood 20 metres high when it was erected along with a line of smaller stones around 4700BC. This giant stone weighing in at 330 tonnes is of a type of rock that occurs at least 10km away and would have been dragged to this site. The menhir fell and broke, probably due to earth tremors, around 4000BC and smaller stones are long got robbed for other structures on this site and elsewhere. Also on the site are 2 seperate grave monuments. The first is the Table des Marchands a dolmen that has been partly reconstructed. It was originally constructed with pieces of stone with decorative carvings that show they came from the adjacent broken and missing menhirs. Then there is the Er-Grah tumulus that started life as a cairn before 4000BC and was extended to a 140 metre long tumulus that was completed around 3300BC. Here the remains of the grave goods here were found to contain axe heads and precious stones of a rock found in Northern Spain. Obviously the grave of an important person.

Our 2 day cultural trip to visit the stones left us in awe yet again of what these people achieved so long ago. Something to ponder as we headed further west to our “home” in Finistere.